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Short Bio

Since March 2014 I have been a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Applied Sciences, Landshut Germany. My teaching and research  focuses on Mobile and Distributed Systems, and I am co-leading the Mobile Computing Lab there.

The decade prior to that (2005 - 2014) I spent in industry in Silicon Valley, where I  worked for Google, VMware and Amazon in various Senior Engineering Positions. Check out my LinkedIn profile for more details.

From 2002 - 2005 I was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Pittsburgh, PA teaching and researching programming languages and compilers and software engineering.

I received my Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2002 from the University of Washington, Seattle, one of the world's top ranked research universities in Computer Science.

Research Interests

My Ph.D. and past research while a faculty at Pitt, was focused on compilers and their interaction with computer architecture as well as tool support for software engineering. I have a significant number of publications at first tier conferences (cf. publications list).
During my decade in the Silicon Valley, I become intimitely familiar with the engineering of large scale distributed systems (I was a senior engineer in the ads backend and the Google Docs storage backend) and had a  first hand opportunity to work on what is now commonly called "Big Data". At the Kindle division of Amazon, I got into into development of  mobile application, which is now a main research focus at the University of Applied Sciences, Landshut.
One current research thrust is based on Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons (like the iBeacon) and in my lab we have built several interesting applications for them, namely a room information system for the unviersity, a realtime bus traffic info system, and a beacon mediated chat system based on MQTT. (Details can be found in: Mock, Seel: Proximity Based Services, to be published by Springer 2016 (in German).

Teaching

My teaching philosophy is based upon the "learning by doing" concept and strives to confront students with real word applications and problems to make the theoretical learnings immediately meaningful and relevant.

Current courses include: Introduction to programming in C/ C++, Computer Architecture, Concepts of Modern Programming Languages, Big Data Algorithms and Systems, and Mobile Computing.
In that past, I have also taught classes on Compilers and Software Engineering.



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